Sony Arouje

a programmer's log

Posts Tagged ‘raspberry pi

Farm Automation system based on Arduino and Raspberrypi

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Last two weeks, in my free time, I was working on a system to automate  Green house or an open field. The system designed using Arduino Nano and Raspberry Pi. The Arduino is used to read sensors and control devices and the Raspberry pi is the brain that decides what to do when an event detected by Arduino. All the systems communicates wirelessly via XBee.

In normal scenario in a farm we have to

  • Switch on the drip irrigation pump when the soil humidity is low.
  • Switch off when the soil is wet.
  • Switch on the Main motor that connects to a water source when the reservoir level goes down.
  • Switch off the main motor when the reservoir is full.
  • If it’s a Green house then monitor the humidity and control devices to increase or decrease the humidity. Also need to control temperature.

 

Below is a very ugly drawing I could come up : ), to explain the system.

image

 

Arduino based nodes

The nodes are connected to different Sensors like Soil Humidity, Temperature, Air Humidity, etc. Also the nodes can also switch on/Off drip irrigation motor, switch on/off Reservoir’s Solenoid valves, or control any hardware needed in the field.

Raspberry pi Brain

I developed this central/brain system in Nodejs. The system is very much generic and run based on configurations. So nothing is hardcoded. The XBee connected to the pi act as the coordinator and receive periodic sensor inputs from Ardunio connected in the field. This system can issue command to control devices based on the sensor inputs.

 

Let’s go through some of the scenarios to see how the system works.

Watering the plants: From the above picture you can see, there are 5 Arduino’s in the field sensing different parameters. For now lets think that they all reads the soil humidity. Say soil humidity value range from 0 to 100, where 0 is dry and 100 is fully wet. We need to switch on the drip irrigation motor when any of the sensor value is less than 20. Once all the sensor give a humidity value greater than 90 we need to switch off the motor.

As you can see the system need to take action based on the values coming from the sensor. Depending upon the crops these values can be changed. That’s where the Central Node js system comes into play.

In the central system, we can group the Sensor nodes and configure the triggering points. Also we can configure what to do when the triggering points reach. For e.g. in the above case we can say when the soil humidity of any sensor goes below 20, then send the Motor switch on command to the node sitting next to the Reservoir motor. To switch off the motor, the system needs approval from all the sensors, that means the motor will get switched off if all the nodes reported value is greater than 90.

Failover: What happens when a sensor node dies without sending soil humidity greater than 90 value, will the motor run whole day? No, the central system can be configured for that too, while configuring we can set up a timeout period. If the central system is not receiving high water level after a configured time, it automatically sends a Switch off command to the desired Arduino node to switch off the motor.

Filling Reservoir: From the above diagram, we can see there are two reservoirs and one Main motor. The main motor need to switch on to fill the Reservoir. Each reservoir is equipped with sensors to detect the High and Low water level. Also each water input is equipped with a solenoid valve. If the reservoir is high then the solenoid valve will close the input thus protect the reservoir from overflowing. Once all the reservoir get filled the system will switch off the Main motor before closing the last solenoid, other wise the pressure increase and can damage the Main motor.

The Arduino node will send a Water low when the water go down below a desired level. Then the central system will open the Solenoid before switching on the Main motor. The valve will open only for the reservoir where the water is low, rest all the valves will be closed.

If more than one Reservoir’s water is low then those valves will be open and the main pump will work until all the reservoir’s are filled. For e.g. say Reservoir A and B’s water level is low then both the valves will be open and switch on the main pump. A get filled and B is still not full then A’s valve will get closed. Once B is full the system will send Main pump switch off command then sends the command to close B’s valve.

 

System design

All the above scenarios are based on certain rules and all these rules are configurable. The central system is not aware of any rules. Based on the fields condition we need to configure it.

 

User can also see the activities in the farm via a dashboard. I haven’t designed any Dashboard UI yet.

 

Happy farming…

Written by Sony Arouje

February 17, 2016 at 6:16 pm

Communication between Raspberry Pi and Arduino using XBee

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Recently I was doing some experiments to establish a wireless communication between a Raspberry pi and Arduino. To establish wireless communication I used XBee Pro Series 2 from Digi International. The idea behind this test setup is to test, whether I can control devices like motor or read different sensors remotely.

One of the biggest advantage of using XBee is, you can find a lot of tutorials and libraries for any kind of system and programming languages. For this test app, I used Node js in RPi and C in Arduino.

Test Setup

XBee: I configured two xbee, one as Coordinator and another as Router. Both in API mode 2 (AP =2). I used XCTU to configure both the device. Only reason to choose API 2 is because the Arduino library I used only support API mode 2.

Raspberry pi: connected Coordinator XBee to one of my RPi. You can see more about the connection in one of my earlier post.

Arduino Uno: connected the Router xbee to one of my Arduino. The connection is pretty simple as below.

  • XBee Rx –> Arduino Tx
  • XBee Tx -> Arduino Rx
  • XBee 3.3v-> Arduino 3.3v
  • XBee Gnd –>Arduino Gnd

 

Raspberry Pi Node js code

Modules used

  • xbee-api: npm install xbee-api
  • serialport: npm install serialport

 

var util = require('util'); var SerialPort = require('serialport').SerialPort; var xbee_api = require('xbee-api'); var C = xbee_api.constants; var xbeeAPI = new xbee_api.XBeeAPI({ api_mode: 2 }); var serialport = new SerialPort("/dev/ttyAMA0", { baudrate: 9600, parser: xbeeAPI.rawParser() }); var frame_obj = { type: 0x10, id: 0x01, destination64: "0013A200407A25AB", broadcastRadius: 0x00, options: 0x00, data: "MTON" }; serialport.on("open", function () { serialport.write(xbeeAPI.buildFrame(frame_obj)); console.log('Sent to serial port.'); }); // All frames parsed by the XBee will be emitted here xbeeAPI.on("frame_object", function (frame) { console.log(">>", frame); if(frame.data!== undefined) console.log(frame.data.toString('utf8')); });

 

 

Arduino Sketch

This sketch uses a XBee library, to add the library, goto Sketch->Include Library->Manage Libraries. From the window search for XBee and install the library. I am using Arduino IDE 1.6.7.

I use SoftwareSerial to establish serial communication with XBee, Pin 2 is Arduino Rx and Pin 3 is Arduino Tx.

 

#include <Printers.h> #include <XBee.h> #include <SoftwareSerial.h> unsigned long previousMillis = 0; const long interval = 4000; // the interval in mS XBee xbee = XBee(); // XBee's DOUT (TX) is connected to pin 2 (Arduino's Software RX) // XBee's DIN (RX) is connected to pin 3 (Arduino's Software TX) SoftwareSerial soft(2,3);// RX, TX Rx16Response rx16 = Rx16Response(); ZBRxResponse rx = ZBRxResponse(); XBeeAddress64 addr64 = XBeeAddress64(0x0013a200,0x407a25b5); char Buffer[128]; char RecBuffer[200]; void setup() { // put your setup code here, to run once: soft.begin(9600); Serial.begin(9600); xbee.setSerial(soft); } void print8Bits(byte c){ uint8_t nibble = (c >> 4); if (nibble <= 9) Serial.write(nibble + 0x30); else Serial.write(nibble + 0x37); nibble = (uint8_t) (c & 0x0F); if (nibble <= 9) Serial.write(nibble + 0x30); else Serial.write(nibble + 0x37); } void print32Bits(uint32_t dw){ print16Bits(dw >> 16); print16Bits(dw & 0xFFFF); } void print16Bits(uint16_t w){ print8Bits(w >> 8); print8Bits(w & 0x00FF); } void loop() { // put your main code here, to run repeatedly: xbee.readPacket(); if (xbee.getResponse().isAvailable()) { if (xbee.getResponse().getApiId() == ZB_RX_RESPONSE) { xbee.getResponse().getZBRxResponse(rx); if (rx.getOption() == ZB_PACKET_ACKNOWLEDGED) { // the sender got an ACK Serial.println("got ACK"); } else { // we got it (obviously) but sender didn't get an ACK Serial.println("not got ACK"); } Serial.print("Got an rx packet from: "); XBeeAddress64 senderLongAddress = rx.getRemoteAddress64(); print32Bits(senderLongAddress.getMsb()); Serial.print(" "); print32Bits(senderLongAddress.getLsb()); Serial.println(' '); // this is the actual data you sent Serial.println("Received Data: "); for (int i = 0; i < rx.getDataLength(); i++) { print8Bits(rx.getData()[i]); Serial.print(' '); } //Received data as string to serial Serial.println(' '); Serial.println("In string format"); for (int i = 0; i < rx.getDataLength(); i++) { if (iscntrl(rx.getData()[i])) RecBuffer[i] =' '; else RecBuffer[i]=rx.getData()[i]; } Serial.println(RecBuffer); String myString = String((char *)RecBuffer); if(myString=="MTON"){ Serial.println("Switching on Motor"); } else if(myString=="MTOFF"){ Serial.println("Switching off Motor"); } } //clear the char array, other wise data remains in the //buffer and creates unwanted results. memset(&RecBuffer[0], 0, sizeof(RecBuffer)); memset(&Buffer[0], 0, sizeof(Buffer)); } //Send a packet every 4 sec. unsigned long currentMillis = millis(); if (currentMillis - previousMillis >= interval) { // save the last time you blinked the LED previousMillis = currentMillis; strcpy(Buffer,"RSLOW"); uint8_t payload[20]= "RSLOW"; // ZBTxRequest zbtx = ZBTxRequest(addr64,(uint8_t *)Buffer,sizeof(Buffer)); ZBTxRequest zbtx = ZBTxRequest(addr64,payload,sizeof(payload)); xbee.send(zbtx); } }

 

Burn the sketch to Arduino.

Testing

Run node js code in RPi and you start receiving the frames from Arduino.

 

 

Happy coding….

Written by Sony Arouje

January 21, 2016 at 12:06 am

Water Level Sensor for my Aeroponic– First Experiment in PCB design

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Last couple of weeks in my free times I was learning PCB design and basic Electronics. I studied basic electronics in College but that’s only to pass the exam. A couple of weeks ago, when I decided to learn basics of electronics, the only component I knew was Resistor. Rest I learned from YouTube and other blogs.

Next step was PCB Design, I went through so many YouTube videos and created so many designs using Eagle CAD (used Community Edition) and redo the design in several different ways. After some days of experiments with Eagle I was some what confident to design something that I could use in my Aeroponic system, a Water Level sensor. I cant design an electronic circuit but I learn to read Schematic designed by experts in Electronics.

I started searching for a right design for me to try out. I prototyped several design in breadboard but none of them worked as per my requirement. After several trial and error I finalized the below design I copied from one of the site, unfortunately I don’t know from where I copied the schema. (I will refer the url if I get that page again.)

image

Note: Above is a schema I created in Eagle cad, original author’s schema was very beautiful. Also I didn’t spend much time in schema, my goal was to design the PCB.

PCB Design

The next step was my area of interest, the PCB design. Below is the design I came up after several rearrangements of components.

image

 

PCB Etching

There are so many videos in YouTube detailing the PCB Etching process. I decided the approach of Laser printing the design on a glossy paper and doing thermal transfer to copper clad board. My friend Vinod, took a print out of the design on a Magazine cover. Yesterday night, with the help of Pressing iron and some Ferrous chloride, I created my first PCB. It’s a WOW moment for me.

fotor_(352)

 

I dill the holes using my Dremel rotatory tool. I added a Silk Screen as well. Printed the top screen in mirror mode on a Glossy paper and transfer to the board using my Wife’s Nail polish remover, It worked, you can see the silk screen in the below picture.

Final Board

fotor_(354)

Yes it’s a pretty simple circuit but I learned a lot from all these experiments.

Connecting to Raspberry Pi

The sensor will give two outputs, warning and critical status. Those two yellow wires are the sensor outputs, connect those to two GPIO pins of my pi. This is what I programmed.

1. Warning: The system will send a mail to me saying the water is below warning level.

2. Danger/Critical: The system will send a mail as well as shutdown the Submersible pump. If the pump run dry for a minute or two it will damage the pump.

3. When some one fill the tank with water above warning level, the motor will resume running and send a mail to me saying water level is fine.

Written by Sony Arouje

April 2, 2015 at 4:34 pm

Raspberry Pi controlled Aeroponic System V2

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Last one and half months I was working on my Aeroponic System V2. In this post I will dissect the system and will see each component and what it does. I would like to thank my wife for her tremendous support for helping me in every phase of the development, also she takes care of the germination process and replanting to the system.

Working of the Aeroponic system (video)

Aeroponic system in action

Vertical Growing Medium

2015_03_15_11_01_19_ProShot

Here the plants root are growing in Air and the nutrient mixed water will flow through the pipe in periodic intervals. As of now we are growing Spinach and Amaranth.

Irrigation pipes

2015_03_15_11_01_29_ProShot

I fixed a valve to control the water flow. Without this valve the first outlet receives more water because of gravitation and subsequent outlet receives less and the last one receives none. With this valve I can adjust the water flow and helps to get water to each outlet equally.

Reservoir

2015_03_15_11_04_55_ProShot

Normal hydroponic systems use water tanks to hold the nutrient mixed water. I decided to buy one tank as well but the tank is 1 feet tall, that means the vertical growing medium must be place above the tank level and I will loose 1.5 feet from each growing medium. I have total 6 towers and in total I will loose 9 feet of growing medium and will reduce around 30 cups.

After a lot of thoughts I come up an idea to use 6 inch pipe as the reservoir. With simple math I realize that I could store more than 50 lts of water in a 10 feet 6” pipe.

The reservoir has a Submersible pump that can pump 12000 liters per hour. It also have a wave maker to mix Nutrients or pH modifier agents.

Nutrient Feeder

2015_03_15_11_04_39_ProShot

I made two containers from a 4 inch PVC pipe and connect two dosage pumps to pump nutrient from Nutrient tank to Reservoir.

I can add Nutrients by pressing a push button in the control board or via the mobile app. For each press of Push button will add 10 ml of nutrients. Through mobile I can add any amount of Nutrients and can do it from any where from the world.

Controller system will automatically activate the wave maker after adding nutrients, so the nutrients will get mixed well.

 

Controller System

2015_03_15_11_03_29_ProShot

 

The controller system has different components, I numbered each component for ease of explanation.

1. Water Pump switch: Water pump will run in a periodic interval controlled by application running in Rasbperry pi. In some situation I wanted to run the pump immediately without waiting for the interval. With this switch I could run the motor immediately. I can also activate pump from my mobile application as well.

2. Wave Maker switch:  As I said earlier the reservoir is equipped with Wave maker to mix Nutrients or pH modifiers. I could activate Wave maker any time by pressing the push button. I used this mostly after adding pH modifiers. Nutrient feeding system will automatically switch on Wave maker after adding nutrients.

3. Nutrients Feeder switch: This push button switch will add 10 ml of nutrients to the reservoir. If I wanted to add more nutrients I could do that via the mobile application.

4. Raspberry pi: The brain of my Aeroponic system. Each and every component is connected to this device. The controller program is written in Node js.

5. Relays: component to switch on/off each hardware like Water pump, Wave maker, etc.

The system is powered with a 12v DC and 240v AC. Each power source can be switched off separately by the two buttons below the Raspberry pi.

Written by Sony Arouje

March 15, 2015 at 7:59 pm

Connecting XBee to Raspberry pi

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Last one week I was doing some research in RF communication and controlling devices using RF. So what am I going to control here, I wanted to control the water pump running in my hydroponic reservoir without running wires from my raspberry pi. This way I can extend my hydroponic system to more balconies without buying extra RPi, a single RPi will send a switch on/off command and the RF client will switch on/off the motor via a relay. Also I don’t need to setup a wifi network in my controller RPi’s.

My research for RF communication platform leads to Zigbee protocol and XBee component. XBee is a very popular Zigbee complaint product from Digi. For my testing I got two XBee Pro S2 and two XBee explorer. The explorer I bought uses USB to A/B cable, if you are buying it make sure buy A/B cable as well. You will get micro usb explorer as well.

To configure the XBee’s I use the X-CTU software from Digi, you can download it free from Digi’s website. I use the Legacy X-CTU for configuring my modules and Next Generation X-CTU for issuing commands. Configuration is pretty simple and so many sites will walk you through it. I configure my XBee’s as shown below. One XBee act as Coordinator and enabled API mode and another XBee act as router and enabled Router AT.

XBee Coordinator

  • Modem: XBP24-ZB
  • Function Set: ZIGBEE CORDINATOR API
  • PAN: <set a pan id, say 123>
  • Destination Address Low: FFFF

XBee Router

  • Modem: XBP24-ZB
  • Function Set: ZIGBEE ROUTER AT
  • PAN: <set a pan id, say 123>
  • Destination Address Low: 0000

I left all other settings as default.

Connecting to Raspberry pi

For testing I connected the XBee coordinator to my computer and XBee Router to my RPi. In RPi I created a simple node app to send some text message to coordinator. Below diagram will show you, how I connected Router XBee to my RPi. Here we use serial communication between RPi and XBee. RPi has only one set of serial communication pin and by default it’s configured for console I/O, there are so many tutorial out there to free it up and I use one from them.

connection_diagram_bb

image developed using Fritzing

I connected the XBee directly using jumper wires, the above diagram is just for illustration for that I use the breadboard.

Connect RPi 3.3 volt to XBee 3.3 volt pin, Ground to XBee ground, Rx to Xbee Tx (Data Out), Tx to XBee Rx (Data In).

Sending some data from Router Xbee to Coordinator

Now I wanted to send some data from Router XBee connected to my RPi  to the coordinator connected to my Computer.

I created a small app using node js, below is the code. To run the code we have to install two node modules.

  • xbee-api: npm install xbee-api
  • serialport: npm install serialport
var util = require('util');
var SerialPort = require('serialport').SerialPort;
var xbee_api = require('xbee-api');

var C = xbee_api.constants;

var xbeeAPI = new xbee_api.XBeeAPI({
    api_mode: 1
});

var serialport = new SerialPort("/dev/ttyAMA0", {
    baudrate: 9600,
    parser: xbeeAPI.rawParser()
});

serialport.on("open", function () {
    var frame_obj = {
        type: 0x10, 
        id: 0x01, 
        destination64: "0013A200407A25A7",
        broadcastRadius: 0x00,
        options: 0x00, 
        data: "Hello world" 
    };
    
    serialport.write(xbeeAPI.buildFrame(frame_obj));
    console.log('Sent to serial port.');
});

serialport.on('data', function (data) {
    console.log('data received: ' + data);
});


// All frames parsed by the XBee will be emitted here
xbeeAPI.on("frame_object", function (frame) {
    console.log(">>", frame);
});

 

When I run the above node app, I can see the data receiving in my Coordinator’s X-CTU app. I could also send a Remote AT (0x17) command to the router to one of the Digital pin and could turn On/Off a LED.

Seems like the communication is working fine. Let’s see what I can come up next.

 

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Written by Sony Arouje

December 20, 2014 at 6:07 pm

Posted in Raspberry Pi

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Access Raspberry Pi via internet

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In this post I will explain how to access Raspberry pi via Internet. I am trying out a home automation system using Pi and I wanted to access a node.js service running in my Raspberry pi. Also I may wanted to SSH to the pi to restart or configure it while I am away from home.

Configuring the Router

In my home Raspberry Pi is connected to a Netgear R6300 router. The router is then connected to a DSL modem. In these kind of setup we might be dealing with four different IP’s

  1. External IP assigned to you by your ISP.
  2. IP Address of the modem
  3. IP Address of the Router assigned by the modem
  4. IP Address of the Raspberry Pi assigned by Router.

Prerequisite

  • Credentials to login to the Modem configuration.
  • Credentials to login to the router configuration.

External IP: you can get your external ip by visiting whatismyip.com

IP Address of the Modem and Router: As I am using Netgear modem, I login into Netgear genie app. And from the Internet section I could see the IP Address assigned  to my router as shown below.

image

As you could see  the IP address assigned to my router is 192.168.1.2. Also you can see the Gateway IP address 192.168.1.1, that IP will be the IP address of your modem.

IP address of the Raspberry pi: SSH to Raspberry PI and issue ‘ifconfig’ command and you can see some details and check wlan0 as shown below. Line in bold shows the ip address of the Pi.

wlan0     Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 04:a1:51:6a:fb:8d
              inet addr:10.0.0.10  Bcast:10.0.0.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
              UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
              RX packets:5543 errors:0 dropped:11 overruns:0 frame:0
              TX packets:1799 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
              collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
              RX bytes:1200798 (1.1 MiB)  TX bytes:192891 (188.3 KiB)

 

In my scenario I assigned a static IP to this Pi, other wise router’s DHCP server will assign ip and might change from time to time. So most router have configuration, to set static IP to the devices and will never change. At my house most of the devices like TV, Tabs and Raspberry PIs have static IP’s and the guest devices uses DHCP assigned IP’s.

Let’s configure SSH to the Pi from internet.

Router Port Forwarding

Excerpt from Genie help

Port forwarding is designed for FTP, Web server, or other server-based services. Once port forwarding is set up, requests from the Internet are forwarded to the proper server.

In the Genie app you can find Port forwarding in Advanced setup->Port forwarding/Port triggering, you might be able to find some thing similar in other modem’s configuration.

I clicked ‘Add Custom Service’ button and it will show the below screen to setup Port forwarding configuration. Here I am configuring SSH.

image

Here  22 is the port where SSH server in my PI is listening. Internal IP address is the IP address of the Raspberry Pi. Click apply and the changes will get saved.

We setup the port forwarding in the router. We need to do the similar configuration in Modem.

Modem Port Forwarding

Enter the IP address of the modem in the Chrome/IE, enter the user name and password if prompted.

Note: My DSL modem is pretty old one and may not be match with the interface of your modem configuration screen.

The port forwarding configuration in my Modem is located at Advanced Setup/NAT/Virtual servers. See the configuration below.

image

Here I setup the external port number as well as internal port number. You can have different external port number if you want, say for e.g. external port number 8090 can be mapped to internal port number 22. The server IP address should be the IP address of the router.

Check whether the port is opened by going to yougetsignal.com, if the port is still closed then you might need to do Port triggering in Modem as shown below.

image

 

We successfully configured SSH to Raspberry Pi from internet, you can check using a machine connected to a different network and connect to Pi using any SSH client like Putty. While connecting the IP address should be the external IP address and the port should be the one configured in Modem, here it’s 22.

Conclusion

The above approach will work, in case you want to open any port, I have a node.js service listening to 8090 in the same Raspberry pi. I did the above approach to access it via internet.

Leave your comments if you like this post or in case of any questions.

Written by Sony Arouje

June 25, 2014 at 3:33 pm

PI Tracker in action–video

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In my last post I gave an overview of a toy I created using Raspberry Pi and the components used for it. After that some of my friends wanted to see the toy in action and here is the video.

PI Tracker

Video Streaming

A new feature added to the tracker after the last post is the video streaming to the controlling device. In the modified tracker a USB camera is attached to the front of the tracker and connected to the Raspberry Pi. The RaspPi host a mjpg streamer and the video can be streamed to any device connected to the same network, including the Android device that controls the tracker. This helps my son to sit anywhere in the house and control the tracker.

 

Stay tuned for the next post with source code and more…

Edit: A new post added explaining the Source code running in Raspberry pi

Written by Sony Arouje

June 12, 2014 at 6:22 pm

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